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CCHS pitcher signs to play baseball at USC Bluffton

Bottom row: Willis Dopson , Tara Dopson, Willis “D” Dopson, and CCHS Athletic Director Lorraine Browning. Top row: Arlene Washington (D’s aunt), CCHS Assistant Coach Vince Connors, CCHS Head Coach Percy Knight, and CCHS Assistant Coach Paul Pye. Photo by Rick Tobin

Bottom row: Willis Dopson , Tara Dopson, Willis “D” Dopson, and CCHS Athletic Director Lorraine Browning. Top row: Arlene Washington (D’s aunt), CCHS Assistant Coach Vince Connors, CCHS Head Coach Percy Knight, and CCHS Assistant Coach Paul Pye. Photo by Rick Tobin

Willis “D.” Dobison knows his baseball. He started playing T-ball at age four, and hasn’t stopped playing since.

The effort helped him achieve quite a prize towards the end of his senior year at Colleton County High School (CCHS). On Friday, “D,” as he is nicknamed, signed to play baseball at the University of South Carolina’s Bluffton campus.

After playing T-ball, he kept on playing right through the Dixie Majors, where he was coached by his father, Willis Dobison. He made the all-star team when he was both 11 and 12 years old. He started playing B-Team ball in the CCHS at seventh grade, quickly moved up to the JV team, and has been playing Varsity ball for the past five years.

D’s specialty is his pitching. Willis said his son has a good fastball, slider, and changeup. He added that D does have a curve, but it is not as well-developed as it could be. “He’s just starting out.” Willis added that, although pitching is his son’s specialty, he can play the outfield and can hit the baseball.

Willis noted that one particular game made him especially proud of his son. “He pitched six innings this year against the Wando Warriors, and the team was rated sixth in the state at that time. The Cougars upset the Warriors in that match-up.” Willis added that, as a freshman, “D” pitched five innings against Wando and struck out Warrior Drew Cisco, who was a major league prospect at the time. After graduation, Cisco immediately entered the minor leagues.