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Add Bird Feeders to Christmas Wish List

The holiday season calls for family and friends to celebrate religion, and to focus on the Christmas wishes of children. Unless a specific wish list is supplied by someone to use as a shopping guide, then many will opt to give a gift of cash or perhaps even a gift card. While toys and such are still preferred for kids, it can be tougher to figure out a thoughtful gift for adults. Giving the gift of a bird feeder is a small way to increase habitat for wildlife, without breaking the bank, and it also can serve as the type of gift that keeps on giving all year long.
It is easy to locate bird feeders for sale, since they can be found locally at department stores, hardware stores, feed stores and even in antiques stores. The cost of a new bird feeder is not usually out of reach for gift givers, but the wide variety of feeders can sometimes make for a tough decision about which one to buy. The model of birdfeeder chosen will have some impact on the type of birdseed that will go inside to fill it up. Since the birdseed will not last forever, the birdfeeder can simply be enjoyed temporarily, or the new owner can decide to fill it up whenever they want to welcome some feathered friends to their yard.
A tube feeder is likely the most common birdfeeder available and it usually is a clear cylinder that hangs from a tree limb, with several small feeding ports. The tube feeder requires smaller size birdseed, and generally will attract smaller birds like the Carolina chickadee or the tufted titmouse. There is a range of smaller birds that frequent tube feeders in the Lowcountry, so tis quite likely that a tube feeder will draw lots of attention. The tube feeder is economical regarding birdseed too, so it remains a cost conscious gift.
Hopper birdfeeders offer a classic look with four walls and roof that form a box, capable of holding larger amounts of birdseed which filters out onto feeding perches. Small birdseed and larger varieties like sunflower seeds work well in the hopper style feeder, which serves birds best when mounted on a post for a stable platform. This feeder is not entirely weatherproof during wet weather, since moisture can affect the birdseed, but hopper feeders will attract the most recognizable backyard birds like cardinals and blue jays.
Peanut cage feeders give bird watchers another option to attract woodpeckers and other opportunistic birds. The peanuts can be placed in the feeder in their shell, or already shelled, and some stores sell suet pellets that resemble peanuts to pace in these feeders. The cost of peanuts is higher than regular birdseed, so this option would be costlier over time, but it makes a good option if someone already has the other type of feeders. Another specialty cage style feeder can hold cakes of suet that attracts woodpeckers, working especially well during cold weather since it offers a high energy food.
If it is winter in the Lowcountry, that can add migratory birds to the backyard including colorful goldfinches. A goldfinch feeder holds tiny thistle seeds that not many birds will utilize, but it works wonders on attracting goldfinches into view. Ornamental bird seed feeders come in simple shapes like a bell, a pine cone or even a snowman and they usually consist of a mix of seed types. I find that these ornamental hanging feeders attract goldfinches too, but they also disintegrate faster when exposed to inclement weather, as opposed to thistle feeders which tend not to have spoilage.
Don’t forget that the perfect companion to birdseed for attracting backyard birds into view is a simple bird bath. Usually a shallow basin of water works best, and remember to vary its location to find out where it seems most effective. For instance, placement next to a bush that birds can scoot into for cover is always a good idea, and the closer to the ground the better. Birds come to feeders, and to water, during activity cycles that are hard to predict, which makes spotting them more of a treat. Weather changes can also make birds feed voraciously and learning to witness such events can make for memorable encounters, creating the kind of cheerful memories that Christmas gift givers hope to inspire.
The holiday season calls for family and friends to celebrate religion, and to focus on the Christmas wishes of children. Unless a specific wish list is supplied by someone to use as a shopping guide, then many will opt to give a gift of cash or perhaps even a gift card. While toys and such are still preferred for kids, it can be tougher to figure out a thoughtful gift for adults. Giving the gift of a bird feeder is a small way to increase habitat for wildlife, without breaking the bank, and it also can serve as the type of gift that keeps on giving all year long.
It is easy to locate bird feeders for sale, since they can be found locally at department stores, hardware stores, feed stores and even in antiques stores. The cost of a new bird feeder is not usually out of reach for gift givers, but the wide variety of feeders can sometimes make for a tough decision about which one to buy. The model of birdfeeder chosen will have some impact on the type of birdseed that will go inside to fill it up. Since the birdseed will not last forever, the birdfeeder can simply be enjoyed temporarily, or the new owner can decide to fill it up whenever they want to welcome some feathered friends to their yard.
A tube feeder is likely the most common birdfeeder available and it usually is a clear cylinder that hangs from a tree limb, with several small feeding ports
The tube feeder requires smaller size birdseed, and generally will attract smaller birds like the Carolina chickadee or the tufted titmouse. There is a range of smaller birds that frequent tube feeders in the Lowcountry, so tis quite likely that a tube feeder will draw lots of attention. The tube feeder is economical regarding birdseed too, so it remains a cost conscious gift.
Hopper birdfeeders offer a classic look with four walls and roof that form a box, capable of holding larger amounts of birdseed which filters out onto feeding perches. Small birdseed and larger varieties like sunflower seeds work well in the hopper style feeder, which serves birds best when mounted on a post for a stable platform. This feeder is not entirely weatherproof during wet weather, since moisture can affect the birdseed, but hopper feeders will attract the most recognizable backyard birds like cardinals and blue jays.
Peanut cage feeders give bird watchers another option to attract woodpeckers and other opportunistic birds. The peanuts can be placed in the feeder in their shell, or already shelled, and some stores sell suet pellets that resemble peanuts to pace in these feeders. The cost of peanuts is higher than regular birdseed, so this option would be costlier over time, but it makes a good option if someone already has the other type of feeders. Another specialty cage style feeder can hold cakes of suet that attracts woodpeckers, working especially well during cold weather since it offers a high energy food.
If it is winter in the Lowcountry, that can add migratory birds to the backyard including colorful goldfinches. A goldfinch feeder holds tiny thistle seeds that not many birds will utilize, but it works wonders on attracting goldfinches into view. Ornamental bird seed feeders come in simple shapes like a bell, a pine cone or even a snowman and they usually consist of a mix of seed types. I find that these ornamental hanging feeders attract goldfinches too, but they also disintegrate faster when exposed to inclement weather, as opposed to thistle feeders which tend not to have spoilage.
Don’t forget that the perfect companion to birdseed for attracting backyard birds into view is a simple bird bath. Usually a shallow basin of water works best, and remember to vary its location to find out where it seems most effective. For instance, placement next to a bush that birds can scoot into for cover is always a good idea, and the closer to the ground the better. Birds come to feeders, and to water, during activity cycles that are hard to predict, which makes spotting them more of a treat. Weather changes can also make birds feed voraciously and learning to witness such events can make for memorable encounters, creating the kind of cheerful memories that Christmas gift givers hope to inspire.

Jeff Dennis is a Lowcountry native. Read his blog at LowcountryOutdoors.com

Jeff Dennis, Contributor (310 Posts)

Jeff Dennis is a Lowcountry native. Read his blog at www.LowcountryOutdoors.com